A Shocking Diagnosis: Breast Implants ‘Gave Me Cancer’ by Denise Grady

The New York Times May 14, 2017   Raylene Hollrah was 33, with a young daughter, when she learned she had breast cancer. She made a difficult decision, one she hoped would save her life: She had her breasts removed, underwent grueling chemotherapy and then had reconstructive surgery. In 2013, […]

Continue reading...

With Immense Gratitude by Nancy Novack

On April 29, 2004, I was diagnosed with stage IV ovarian cancer which had metastasized to my liver. That was 13 years ago. I had no idea what any of that meant, despite living on this planet in northern California for sixty years. I didn’t know anything about the treatment, […]

Continue reading...

The Generosity of Strangers by Nancy Novack

Many of you have heard my story of surviving stage 4 ovarian cancer which had metastasized to my liver. I was diagnosed 13 years ago. And that I created Nancy’s List as my “love letter” to the universe, my thank you note for my miraculous recovery. I truly enjoy defying […]

Continue reading...

Why Everyone Seems to Have Cancer by George Johnson

  New York Times January 4, 2014 EVERY New Year when the government publishes its Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, it is followed by a familiar lament. We are losing the war against cancer. Half a century ago, the story goes, a person was far more likely to die […]

Continue reading...

Cancer Patients and Doctors Struggle to Predict Outcomes

NPR February 10, 2015   When a doctor tells a patient that she has cancer and has just a year left to live, that patient often hears very little afterward. It’s as though the physician said “cancer” and then “blah, blah, blah.” Anxiety makes it difficult to remember details – […]

Continue reading...

Living With Cancer: Curses and Blessings by Susan Gubar

New York Times Living with Cancer July 16, 2015  “She Was Devastated When the Doctor Told Her It Was Malignant. Her Life Was Changed Forever. She Would Never Be Able to Retrieve That Life Before Cancer.” Credit Painting by Hollis Sigler, 1994.Like someone with bipolar disorder, I see-saw between irritability and […]

Continue reading...

Anne Lamott

Anne Lamott, one of the most interesting writers, wrote this little blog, which says everything we ever needed to know. My six-year-old associate, who sleeps down the hall about thirty feet away with both our doors wide open, wakes up on many mornings and predicts, “This might be the best day ever!” Then, in the dead […]

Continue reading...

Six Ways to Cope with Cancer … Life, Interrupted by Suleika Jouard

People are always giving advice to cancer patients. Whether it is nutritional advice or doctor recommendations or tips on how to quell the nausea that accompanies chemotherapy, just as soon as people hear you are sick they usually want to find a way to help. Most of the advice is […]

Continue reading...

7 Things You Shouldn’t Say to Someone Who Has Cancer by Ellen Breslau

July 2015   We all mean well, but some comments are better left unsaid, while others are most appreciated. When a friend of family member is diagnosed with cancer, there is shock, sadness, and there’s the inevitable question of what to say? “It’s frightening to hear someone talk about cancer, […]

Continue reading...

How Much Do You Want to Know About Your Cancer? by Dr. Mikkael Sekeres and Dr. Timothy Gilligan

The New York Times June, 2016 Your appointment is at 2:00 on a Tuesday afternoon. It’s your first visit to the cancer center. You’re probably wondering what we are going to say to you. A tumor was recently detected in your left lung and has spread to your bones and […]

Continue reading...